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than what people are getting -- >> on social security. that's nothing to did with the deficit. >> but the fact that all of these things need to believe in the grand bargain, sort to speak -- >> they do not. social security shouldn't even be on the table because it is nothing to do with the deficit. doesn't contribute to the deficit. and we're talking about the deficit. why should social security be discussed in that context? >> completely off the table? >> absolutely. absolutely. and that was the -- and that was our position during the campaign. social security has nothing to do with the deficit. does not contribute to it. walled off from it. its own trust fund with $2.7 trillion in it at the moment. and the american people by huge majorities say we shouldn't be cutting social security or for that matter medicare benefits. you can cut medicare in ways you don't cut benefits and the hypocrisy of republicans that said that democrats are terrible because they took $716 billion from medicare for obama care and what do we want to do? pocket the cuts and add more. our chief demand i
trillion in new debt. trillion dollars deficits as far as the eye can see and all he wants to fight for is higher taxes that will fund a mere 8 and a half days of government. frankly nothing but a pathetic disgrace. you the american people deserve a government that lives within its means. you deserve a government that is not obsessed with using your money to accumulate their power. it is time for americans to understand the simple truth of what is going on here. a truth by the way that an abusively biased news media just ignores. joining us now with reaction as america is on the brink republican senators pat toomey and ron johnson. senators, welcome back. >> hi, sean. >> hi, sean. >> sean: let's start with the meeting today. senator toomey, i'm told that the president wassed adamant n the meeting and didn't come off, are the original request was to keep tax rates at the same for the middle class but everybody above $250,000 going up. is that what you heard? >> i haven't heard about specific elements of the conversation, sean, i wasn't in the room. what i do understand from people w
, the thing we're trying to avoid, the actual danger to the economy, is that we will get too much deficit reduction too quickly. if reducing the deficit was what the economy needed we could go right off the cliff and leave it there. you can see it in this graph, that line going down. that is the fiscal cliff, we went over our deficit problems, gone baby, totally, totally gone. one thing the fear of the fiscal cliff shows by the way, in the fox hole, everyone's a kinsian. everyone agrees. that is number one. too much austerity way too quickly. president obama is not asking for that much in taxes. it's worth getting a bit of perspective in here. you'll be shocked to know, we got a graph for that. here's what happens if we go over the cliff. you get more than $5 trillion in tax increases off the bat. and now here's what happens if we pass the sainted simpson bowles plan. you've heard of the plan. they have 2.6 trillion in tax increases. president obama's latest offer to john boehner has 1.2 trillion in taxes. that is half as much, less than half than simpson bowles, and less than a quarter o
. gerri: let's talk about entitlement programs and the impact on them. social security will have a deficit this year of $6 billion yet again. can't keep up with social security. what is the longer-term impact of what is going on on these programs? >> we really do need to have a deal on a big problem, which is the national debt larger than the economy, driven by broken entitlement programs. medicare has a huge deficit, $300 billion every year. 10,000 new beneficiaries every day. medicaid deficit finance right now. those are key parts of a safe bet that we'll b will be fallinr their own financial weight unless they are fixed. what we really have to do on behalf of the next generation. gerri: they want to raise the debt ceiling again, as a matter of fact by monday we will be out of dough. it is unconscionable to me we are in this position again. let's remember what happened last time. the market sold off, the economy went into the tank. will that happen all over again? >> i think it is a serious possibilities out like to make that they don't mix the debt ceiling in with the fiscal cliff. we h
the math and we all absolutely agree on the math that you can't get out of the deficit hole we're in by taxing rich people, even if you tax them at 100%. everybody knows that. when republicans say we don't have a tax problem, we have a spending problem, the fact is we've got both and we can deal with that. let me ask you this. you gave your bletszing ing bl proposal that john boehner put forward. so many congressional republicans are scared of voting for something that feels like, looks like, smells like a tax increase because they're worried your organization will come back to haunt them because you signed a pledge. you gave your blessing and they still couldn't get the votes on the floor. what's up with that? why did that not happen? a week ago i was hopeful we might have a deal. >> okay. because the pledge is not to me. it's to the american people. it's to the people of the state that any congressman or senator is from. they have to feel that they can go to their constituents and say i voted against all efforts to raise taxes. i argued having read the boehner plan, it was s
, we still have this bigger challenge out there of how are we going to fix the deficit and debt problem in this country? we know we have to make hard choices. we know the parties have to work together, and they've got to get to work on this as quickly as possible. >> maya, with the greatest of respect, it seems to me your logic is all over the place. it's very clear the nub of the discussion, the squealing that we have at the moment is whether or not to extend tax cuts. that is, in effect, saying we are going to balloon the deficit further. this is not a conversation about actually fixing the debt, is it? that's not what we're talking about at the moment. we're squealing over, let's keep the deficit big. you seem to be arguing that that's exactly what we should be doing. >> let me explain, because it is more complicated than often things are discussed in washington. the problem with the fiscal cliff is it would put in place deficit reduction, but it would put in deficit reduction too much, too quickly, and with the wrong parts of the budget. so it would let all of the tax cuts expire, i
to worry about and doesn't matter if they sell a lot at the low price. this year, it's deficit and have a lot of inventory. they have gone from managing sales to inventory, that's where the profits go out the window. they want to sell out than sell off. >> more people bought gift cards this year than bought product? >> you tell me, what was on your list this year new and exciting. >> nothing. i wanted socks and shirts. >> you have two things happening, more gift card because nobody knows what to get you- >> and i returned them. >> and they bought you a bad gift so they frankly didn't know what to get you so they foot go something and you will drive more product. >> for $100 go on a gift card how much doesn't get spent? >> 80% don't spend the money and those that do spend spend 116%. stores do like it when they get you in. 16% never get redeemed, money sitting in a drawer. >> marshall, thank you. >> the big old -- what is that a windsor? >> a windsor. double windsor. >> why? >> you try to change the look. don't always want to go narrow. is that a brioni tie? >> what is this a foreign han
and deficit reduction. that fell apart and talks have largely been stalled this entire time. there was a lost pressure to get something done. we have seen some of the impacts of the fiscal cliff. consumers saying they have been more cautious with their holiday spending because of the uncertainty in washington. economists warn it could get worse and the markets could be foiled if we go over the fiscal cliff. taxes will go up for the average american by about $2,000 and could put us back into a recession. >> which nobody wants to see. kristen welker in hawaii. the president is coming back, but they haven't gotten the 48 hour notice. they are very much out there in play. thank you very much for joining us. appreciate it. when the senate returns tomorrow morning, there will be a new emphasis on members taking a larger role in the fiscal cliff negotiations that based off the current offer may only have a smaller deal. a member of the budget committee and outspoken voice on the left side of the aisle. thanks for joining me. good morning. >> mire pleasure. >> we were saying a lack of urgency in wash
hope they never come to a deal because this is the best deficit reduction package the democrats are ever going to get. but let's look at what really is going to happen here. i would be more surprised if they came to a deal in the next five days than i was by the roberts vote on obama care. there's no way these guys are going to come to a deal, and the reason is this. the president has got the upper hand, and his most important partner is the weakest person in this, which is john boehner. john boehner is on the verge of losing credibility with his caucus. he can't take a deal to his caucus that will pass without the help of nancy pelosi, which will pull the entire deal to the left. so what they have to do is they have to go over the cliff. we're just talking about politics, we're not talking about finances here. they have to go over the cliff. that strengthens boehner's hands because now everybody is paying a hell of a lot more taxes and people are blaming the republicans, and now boehner can go to the caucus and maybe get 200 and a few votes and then with nancy pelosi pick off a
yes. the helicopter has to get off the platform since the election, solving or debt and deficit problem knows that you can't cole of our debt problem before it is not faeblible. >> the president arrived at 3310:00 am and made calls to the house and senate leadership as the negotiations continued. do you sense, sir, there is a period of compromise, where nobody was talking and everybody was holding the ground firmly? do you have a greater sense of comp moise as we into -- the speaker said the president didn't next any dale or the compromise so i ge he'll take that up in the shat, hopefully vote for it. >> part part of the problem last week was the conservative wing of the party that i put you in for plan "b," and it was seening a something of a mutiny against john boehner at that point. so i'ming what is do you feel the support think of wing of the part is rhettest to president the measure? >> the this the has to stop a theso threat at the first motion of a pours bill and there were members in the house unwilling to vote on a bill that the president said he's going to veto. the h
deficit in this country is rising health care costs. do we need to tackle those? how do they interact with the changes that are going to be set up across the country. is it going to cost the taxpayer more or less? all those have to be in the realm of realistic facts and figures. >> you're in arizona today. many of your constituents worked over the holidays. do you think congress should have stayed in washington to work together for an agreement? >> absolutely. absolutely. once you know, once the boehner plan b collapsed, all we got was a notification, you can go home, we'll call you when we're ready. >> boehner's got to get off the majority of the majority must agree to something. it's going to take democratic votes to pass a tough fiscal compromise and unless there is inclusion and discussion on both sides of the aisle about this issue, that compromise gets tougher and tougher. >> thank you for coming "outfront." >> appreciate it. thank you. >> now, on the other side of the aisle. congressman, you just heard your arizona colleague say you all should have absolutely stayed in d.c. and
that they have worked with me over the last two years to reduce the deficit more than any other deficit reduction package. >> the ceo of pimco, one of the world's largest investors in bonds. mark standee is chief investor at moody's. and christine romans, host of "your bottom line." gdp, the broadest measure of the economy grew at an annual rate of 3.1% over the summer. we just got those numbers this week. that's more than double the rate of previous quarter. you can see the chart there. it's been choppy but looks like we're going in the right direction. america's economy is gaining pace, doing better than expected. we've been saying that 2013 could be the year of a real economic renaissance in the united states or at least the beginning of one. so talk to me about the consequences to our prosperity if washington doesn't reach a deal. >> the consequences are not good. so what the numbers are telling you is that the private sector is healing. if it were left to its own devices it would heal faster. unfortunately, washington is getting in the way. what we found out this week, ali, is the problem is
in a second. >> proposal to get our deficit uncontrol, avoid tax cuts, or avoid tax hikes on the middle class, and to make sure we can spur jobs and economic growth. a balanced proposal that cuts spending but also asks the wealthiest americans to pay more, proposal that will strengthen the middle class over the long haul and grow our economy over the long haul. during the course of these negotiations i offered to compromise wit republicans in congress. i met them halfway on taxes, and i met them more than halfway on spending. in terms of actual dollar amounts we're not that far apart. as of today i am still ready and willing to get a comprehensive package done. i still believe that reducing our deficit is the right thing to do for the long-term health of our econy and the confidence of our businesses. i remain committed to working towards that goal, whether it happens all at once or whether it happens in several different steps. but, in 10 days we face a deadline. in 10 days under current law tax rates are kedcud you would to -- scheduled to rise on most americans. even though democrats and r
. >> they could have had a more popular message about cutting deficit spending, right? >> the truth is they would have been a lot better off taking the deal that boehner was negotiating with president obama way back when. it was a better deal all the way around. they missed that moment. but i think the real thing is who pays the price. the people who are going to pay the price are the americans, the middle class. this is crazy. it's nuts to be putting us through this. >> all of the focus on tax cuts. but the revenue from increasing the taxes on the wealthy will barely make a debt in the deficit to say nothing of the trillions in debt we're talking about. is this just a symbolic fight this the president is determined to win off his election? >> it's not symbolic. there will be money raised if the taxes are left to expire. but let me just bring up a point. no democrat and certainly not this president has said there should be no spending cuts. on the contrary this president has put on the table an extraordinary amount of spending cuts to the chagrin of many democrats i might add. are they to the ext
is pushing for new taxpayer support for wind projects. with our budget deficit soaring an intense debate is heating up over whether the government should be throwing your tax dollars at industry the first place. i asked robert bryce, senior fellow at the manhattan institute about this issue. let's start with the tax credit. >> sure. gerri: this is industry, let's face it they don't have a whole lot to show for themselves yet we subsidize them to the tune of $1.2 billion. why? >> remember the industry said we're all about reducing carbon dioxide. that was the whole argument. now it shifted we create jobs argument. if congress does not extend production tax credit we'll lose 37,000 jobs. they might get an extension but there is big push among utilities, a lot of groups to end the tax credit and it very well could be ended. gerri: it doesn't work that well. 84% fail to produce electricity when the demand is great. as a solution to our energy problems how would you rate it? >> it is not a solution and it is wholly dependent on electric utilities and electric generation that can be dispatched
, and lays the groundwork for further work on both growth and deficit reduction. that's an achievable goal. that can get done in ten days. >> reporter: you hear we are talking about the words "achievable goals." the reality here is we have fewer days to work with, less talk about some sort of a grand compromise, and more talk about trying to do something to get things done for americans. randi? >> what do you make of the language and tone? i mean, is any sense of a deal sort of evaporating judging from what we're hearing from both sides, tough talk? >> at the very least, we aren't hearing a lot of warm words between the two toward each other. we know they've been working on this for weeks. you just don't hear that thawing when you hear them talking as they did just within the past 24 hours. shows a lot of work to be done in the next few days. how much is behind the scenes when they're divided geographically is the part we don't know. >> yeah. the president certainly also asking -- suggesting that everyone needs time to cool down. will this new proposal pass with republicans, do you think?
that the government reduce its deficit as a condition for raising the debt ceiling. both democrats and republicans earth tactics that shut down the government and ultimately cost america its aaa credit rating for the first time in history. but in a last-minute compromise, both sides agree to a trillion dollars in spending cuts up front and another $1.2 trillion in cuts to be decided by a special congressional supercommittee. but a poison pill was attached. if the supercommittee can't reach a deal, automatic across the board cuts known as a sequester would go into effect be at the exact moment when those bush tax cuts extended for two years would expire. so the point is we could have all seen this coming and some of us did. we yelled at the top of our lungs about it but were drowned out by the election. it seems that good governance gets drowned out by continuous elections in america. this time there may be a serious price to pay for it. >> if we go off the fiscal cliff, be will you notice an immediate change to your wallet? we want to get a reality check from stephen moore, a member of the wall st
% of the population. >> and that he they gave numbers to the cbo that said we were going to cut the deficit. and, in fact, it was a new entitlement that now is going to cost $12 trillion. we're not that far apart on that issue. i've always thought it would cost a lot of money. >> we're going to have your wife call into the show a little later. >> there is a place of frustration there in any twosome, there's a place for someone who doesn't have to be. >> that's true. you're carson. >> can you do that? >> well -- >> you can't do ed mcmahon? >> i'll work on that. who was conan scott? he had a guy, andy richter. >> no, don't do that. you would have to put on a bunch of weight. >> andy was from my hometown in massachusetts. >> was he? >> yeah. >> let's check on the markets. down 47. we came back, closed down just 18 points yesterday. that's the first time in history where someone said that the house coming back in the markets went you up. usually the government comes into session and the markets go down. we're indicated down about 47 points today. oil has been amazingly strong considering that if we
for a job and lays groundwork for more economic growth and deficit reduction. >> just moments ago, senator harry reid says he's readying a bill for a vote by monday. all this follows a rare face-to-face closed door meeting at the white house today between all the key players, the president, the vice president, the treasury secretary and all four congressional leaders huddled together with just four days to go before we all go overs fiscal cliff. that meeting lasted for an hour and five minutes. on a story where every second and every maneuver counts, let's get chief to white house correspondent jessica yellin. jessica, the president says he's modestly optimist being but each also presented a backup plan. does the president really think it will come to that? >> at this point, no, they don't, john, because the white house is hopeful that the agreement that the senators are working on can actually move forward after the meeting here. there is a modest uptick in enthusiasm about that possibility. but as forts backup plan, there's no real likelihood that would ever come to a vote because republ
for further work on both growth and deficit reduction. that's an achievable goal. that can get done in ten days. >> the president's solution of raising tax rates would still leave red ink for as far as the eye can see. and it would hurt jobs at a time when far too many of our citizens are struggling to find them. >> reporter: the difference now, miguel, is in discussion is this for small package that would really only deal with making sure these tax increases don't happen and that these unemployment benefits are extended as the white house sees it. but the bigger issue of trying to deal with deficit reduction of entitlement reform, tax reform that is being put on the shelf right now. >> kicking the can down the road, i suppose. if there is no deal, will workers see extra taxes coming out of their paychecks starting january 1? >> that's the thing. technically taxes increase on january 1st. but if you were looking at your paycheck and trying to figure out am i going to be seeing this here just a matter of a couple weeks, no, actually. we wouldn't expect that you would be seeing your taxes in
important to step back and see the fact that we have already -- there are three parts of this deficit reduction stool. we've already in the past two years passed $1.6 trillion in spending cuts. we've passed over $700 billion in savings in medicare through reforms like cutting back on overpayments to insurance companies. the one piece of this puzzle that we've not been able to get any support for is making sure that the wealthiest among us help solve this problem by being willing to pay a little bit more to be part of the solution. so we have sent a bill to the house back in july, bipartisan bill that says what -- everybody says they don't want middle-class families to have their taxes go up, well, fine. why don't we start with something we can agree on, which is that? and just pass that. why doesn't the house just pass that? but as we know, the speaker couldn't even pass his own plan to say that up to a million dollars was exempt from tax cuts. so what they're doing is holding middle-class families hostage right now, trying to find some maneuver where the wealthiest people continue to
during graham/rudman and i remember when they couldn't get deficit conversations right, treasuries went down and stocks went down. oh, would i love to get back to that type of reality. >> yeah. but you had a different guy at the federal reserve at the time. >> yeah, a different guy, you know, in hindsight he was maybe the monetizer in charge -- in chief, and we get a little historical perspective on that, but as many things that i disagree with alan greenspan on, i thought he was at least more forthright into what he was doing, and even going after the government per se a bit when there were tax issues, all av d avoided by the current chairman ben bernanke, and even though he avoids the conversation, he doesn't avoid giving congress the biggest fire hose in the world filled with free water. >> i love those kind of fire hoses on every corner, please. >> what's that, david? >> bernanke is the most aggressive fed governor we will ever know in the last 40 or 50 years with the monetary stimulation that began in november 2008. >> well her, needed to be? >> and that's likely to still be the o
't love raising taxes. the facts is, if you're serious about this debt, if you're serious about deficit reduction, we have to be able to both get some new revenue. asking millionaires to pay a little bit more in marginal rates. we have to get serious about how we're going to do spending cuts in the right way. republicans have said department of defense shouldn't be on the table. we shouldn't demand more of the 50 seat accountability from across government. we are putting spending cuts on the table and investing for economic growth on the table. we need to stop having a discussion about who the bad guy is and start getting serious about getting this done. >> good luck on sunday night. we're all looking forward to seeing what you guys get done on sunday night when you're back in session. it's good to have you on. we have a market flash. >>> michelle, want to take a check on the share of facebook today. reversing some of the losses on reports that ichb stay gram had lost 25% of its users since it changed its service. the data came from a firm called app data. doing a bit of a deeper dive s
would say copper. i think it has a tremendous potential. we have a production deficit. i think future demand underestimated at this point. particularly in the second half of the year, could be a big winner. >> that would suggest a global growth play. >> it would improve growth, not necessarily explosive growth, but it would express china, for example, the rest of asia. >> favorite commodity in the agricultures? >> i would say corn. there's a battle for the acreage going on between corn, soy beans, cotton. they are all grown in the same area. the demand for corn from both an ethanol standpoint and also from a food calorie standpoint is going to be huge. potential sleeper, copper, because it's the least favored on a price basis so they're not going to be planning much. we could -- >> copper? >> cotton. >> i thought you said copper. >> i might have. >> planting copper, you've got me there, baby. >> they could be a substantial decline in cotton acreage. >> simon? >> can we just take you back to copper. we had a mention of this earlier in the show. the fact that you have these two physical
for deficit reduction. that's an achievable goal. that can get done in ten days. once this legislation's agreed to, i expect democrats and republicans to get back to washington and have it pass both chambers. >> jared bernstein, is this actually a setback for the president insofar as the embarrassed speaker was someone at least with whom he was dealing and now the president really doesn't have a negotiation partner? >> i don't think so. i do think in a way it's a setback for the nation because the president and speaker boehner were actually moving to a credible plausible compromise at the very beginning of the week. and, of course, that's horfully off track now when john boehner decided to go to plan b. i think the leverage is enhanced by this. the problem is i don't know why republicans would nibble at this idea of essentially passing the senate bill. that's what he was describing today sometime before the end of the year when they can wait a few days, go over the cliff and tax rates automatically reach the higher -- i know this is silly, but then they can have a massive tax cut for t
kind of deficit the losers are facial as we go into the new year. "squawk on the street" is back in a minute. [ male announcer ] feeling like a shadow of your former self? c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance? and your mood is on its way down. you might not just be getting older. you might have a treatable condition called low testosterone or low t. millions of men, forty-five or older, may have low t. so talk to your doctor about low t. hey, michael! [ male announcer ] and step out of the shadows. hi! how are you? [ male announcer ] learn more at isitlowt.com. [ laug hey! [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ]
of 2011. republicans demand the government reduce its deficit as a condition for raising the nations's debt ceiling. without a deal, the u.s. would lose its ability to borrow money. they deploy the tactics that nearly shut down the government and ultimaty cost america its aaa credit rating for the first time in history. in a last minute compromise, both sides agree to a trillion dollars in spending cuts up front and another $1.2 trillion in cuts to be decided by a special congressional super committee. a poison pill was attached. if the super committee can't reach a deal, automatic across the board cuts known as the sequester would go into effect starting january 2013. at the exact moment when the bush tax cuts extended for two years would expire. so the point is we could have seen this coming. we yelled at the top of our lungs that we were drowned out by the election. common sense often gets drowned out by seemingly endless and continuous elections in america. this time there may be a series price to pay for it. i will stay on top of this, but for now i'm out. same time tomorrow. li
and do spending cuts and deficit reduction in the new year. he is telling lawmakers take a few days off. relax over the holidays and maybe we'll all come together. take a listen. >> sing some christmas carols, enjoy the company of loved ones. and then i would ask every member of congress while they are back home to think about that think about the obligations we have to the people who sent us here. think about the hardship that so many americans will endure if congress does nothing at all. >> now, i can hear the helicopters warming up there on the other side of the white house from where i am on the south lawn. the president will be heading to andrew's air force base in a moment. is he going to hawaii tonight. on his way out the door told us "see you next week." which means he will be coming back after christmas before new years to try to work this out with lawmakers. he also suggested maybe they have eggnog over the holiday. maybe he thinks that will grease the skids. >> harris: eat cookies and sing carols for the rest of us across the country. you get the accepts he is trying to calm
out of deficit over ten years, isn't that what we really have to do? it seems to me i would really be interested in investing in american equities if i knew the financial situation was under hold >> you say the ends justify the means, no matter how painful? >> it doesn't matter how painful it is and it will be a short shallow recession if we go into it. if we kick the can down the road as so many of you are saying we hope would happen. that's not what should happen for the long-term future of the country. >> you're saying, come on, folks, let's settle. it won't be that big of a deal. right? >> i do disagree with howard a little bit in that i don't think cutting $7.3 trillion, the way this deal says that we should, is the best way to -- to deal with our long-term budget issues. kind of like, you know, you know you have to lose weight so you starve yourself as opposed to some sort of pragmatic balance of, you know, diet and exercise and this deal doesn't get you to the pragmatic part. the flip side, one, cbo projections about future outcomes are based on things being equal and i woul
with deficit reduction that would have dealt with these tax hikes, spending cuts, trying to work out a plan for entitlement reform and tax reform. what's now being worked out is to avert those tax hikes. as president obama wants it, he wants it up to folks earning $250,000, and also wants to deal with unemployment insurance getting that he can extended for unemployed americans but that bigger stuff kicked down the road. >> brianna, will americans actually see their paychecks affected january 1st without a deal? >> reporter: if no deal, that is not expected. technically, the tax hikes would go into effect then, don. but there would be a whole lot of pressure on washington to act, even if we were to go over the fiscal cliff. and because of that, payroll processors would wait to use the new math, if you will. and a lot of people wouldn't see an increase in the taxes taken out of their paychecks until late january or early february when it was clear that the fiscal cliff was here to stay. >> brianna, i am not by nature a jealous person at all. but are you in waikiki? is that waikiki? because i
it was established. but $90 million is not that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since 1992, when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the debt. the depression-era kid and army vet says he wants to give back to a country that has given him so much, a feeling that is infectious. he knows his money wouldn't avert the fiscal cliff. but that is not the message garcia is sending to congress. >> in order to really solve the $16 trillion national debt, you have to sacrifice. >> reporter: politicians talk about kicking the can down the road. one american that is decided that road has to end. and it might as well be here. kyung lah, cnn, san antonio, texas. >>> you have to love that story. and a lot of us lived this one, the wild ride to election day, 2012. cnn national political correspondent jim acosta has more on the story. >> repo
or birth control. all that was ignored. we talked about simpson-bowles, deficit reduction, and affordable care act. >> with no explanation of what they were for the average person. >> it was sort of the inside the beltway debate, and you get one positive debate for the entire fall campaign. you open things up to new voices to broader perspectives. i don't mean to pick on jim lehrer too much, but really, enough of it. >> chris, the worst move? >> the worst move, the decision by both the obama campaign and the not so surprising decision on never raising climate change for the first time. since 1988, if you go back to the tape when lloyd benson, they both said yeah, that will be a problem, we should do something about it. here we are, 24 years later and it doesn't even get a mention in any of the debates. >> i have another video assist, the worst move, the worst decision of the campaign was to do what you're about to see. at the republican convention. >> oh. >> i just wondered -- all of these promises, and then i wondered about -- you know, when -- the -- what do you want me to tell romney?
of the deficit? bring all 3 million of that one weapon back in, let the government, county, state and federal, pay you to take them back. you do don't need them. >>> we have to leave it there. thank you for your time. >>> speaker boehner has said it's up to the senate and the president to come up with a fiscal deal, but as some point out, he'll have to push a bill through the house. given last week's events it won't be easy. "the washington post" columnist e.j. dionne says that may be the silver lining, writing, quote -- now at least we know something important. the current rep majority cannot govern, only a coalition across party lines can get the public's business done. e.j. joins us now, a senior fellow with the brookings institution and an msnbc contributor. e.j., great to see you, as always. john boehner sits to the left of center of his caucus. can he work out a deal without inciting a full-scale revolt? >> well, we don't know that, but i think he'll have to test it. that really tells you something about how conservative the republican caucus has done. john boehner is a good conservativ
to a spectrum of use. what we are telling washington, you are running a deficit for the fourth year in a row and yet you can borrow money almost for nothing. so why don't you just wait another year or two years. who wants to take the fall? who wants to take the political heat if you can borrow money for five years, which is what they are doing now. neil: we are building another debt bubble? >> yes, we are doing so. >> i don't know what you call it. we've never been there before, we've never had a central bank. we've never had anything like that. >> you don't think it can walk past the graveyard much longer? >> i don't think so. i don't think we can whistle the tune very much longer. >> okay. neil: if you had a lead suit you would buy it. [laughter] neil: david, thank you so much. the president isnow speaking out. that coming up next o as you cans customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. pele are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer sa
will turn to a deficit on 2013 in the increasing demand in the auto industry where palladium is used in systems for cars. combined with the global system supply. a rally that began in earnest at the end of 2012 will go into overdrive in the new year. . >> joining us now is dan dickert. you just said palladium. that's a big pick for you? >> i was surprised that sharon spoke about palladium. it was my sleeper bet for 2013. >> what's going on with palladium? >> it's a real industrial metal. it's in short supply. it's undertraded, underowned and one of those industrial metals. it's one of those sleeper metal plays that you can make. used in vehicles? >> in the cat converters. that's the main use for them. there's a real shortage that's been going on in palladium. >> look into the crystal ball. give us an oil price if you came back here a year from today. >> this is the toughest one ever. this is the third year i've conpredictions for you twice. it's not so bad. >> you said it would fluctuate? >> there was one guy who said it would rachet between $130 and $160. i said you have to do bette
solution that gets at our deficit and reduce our debt everything has to be on the table and we'll deal with it. it's great to have rules. we just like to know what they are so we can make the right investments moving forward. >> even if it puts us in a climate of slow growth, even more slow growth than the economy which would be the kind of a climate where you as a ceo wouldn't want to invest in that anyway, you know what i mean? >> so i think a grand bargain won't create a slow economy. i think it will restore confidence and we'll all invest. we'll know what the rules are and the game plan is. weied be ready to move ahead. we have opportunities to grow all the way around the world. we need to know where to put our capital investment. if we know what the rules are, we'll invest. 60% to 65% of our costs are people and we put people back to work every day. >> you don't expect a grand bargain? >> no. >> meaning? >> a short-term fix and perhaps a recession. they talk about this bungee approach and i don't think that's helpful. let's take it away from american businesses and take it away fr
and deficits. >> he's going to do the hammer dance? >> he's one of these great public servant who will say or do whatever it takes to get people's attention on issues that really matter. and this group that sponsored it is the can kicks back. it's not 200 million views. >> i wish we could see al franken dancing in a unitard to fight violence against women. >> make the cut. >> who picked the list? >> we all did it "outfront." >>> up next, a rust belt bright spot in 2013. we're going to take you there, next. last chance to get the best deals of the year on america's freshest lineup. hurry in for the great mileage. hurry in the latest technology. the clock is ticking. so hurry to the final 100 hours of ford's year end celebration. before everything's gone. and one more thing...hurry. get a focus with 2000 cash plus 500 year end bonus cash with no charge sync and sound during the final hundred hours of the ford year end celebration. only at your local ford dealer. >>> well, washington's division and dysfunction threatened our economic recovery, some american cities are working their way back a
social media. >> an old man who is in debt and deficits. >> he's going to do the hammer dance? >> he's one of these great public servant who will say or do whatever it takes to get people's attention on issues that really matter. and this group that sponsored it is the can kicks back. it's not 200 million views. >> i wish we could see al franken dancing in a unitard to fight wviolence against women. >> make the cut. >> who picked the list? >> we all did it. >> up next, a rust belt bright spot in 2013. we're going to take you there, next. and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ mal
for every bill they passed that would add to the deficit. and then they had to exempt themselves from their own rule for the very first bill they introduced when the war on women thing really picked up pace and the republicans' incessant focus on abortion stuff started to hurt the party politically. you remember john boehner insisting over and over again that this anti-abortion stuff was a democratic conspiracy. republicans were not focused on war on women at all, jobs, jobs, jobs. the furthest thing was the anti-abortion legislation. they weren't even working on that. all the while he was making that case, his own republicans kept introducing more and more and more and more anti-abortion legislation. forget what john boehner says. he doesn't speak for us. since john boehner has been speaker, since early 2011, the house has had real trouble just doing basic run of the mill governing stuff. bills failing unexpectedly and needing to be pulled at the last minute and tried again. the republican leadership's own legislation failing to get enough republican votes to pass. and that happening
deficit a la what happened in the '90s. i don't think you should look at this issue in a way to be able to make money off it, though. it's really not a needle mover. as a matter of fact, it can be negative for a lot of the defense companies as we know. they've been under a cloud because of these cuts. here's one from danny in new york. hi, jim. i've heard you say when considering playing the down side of an equity that you would short the stock rather than buy a put. please elaborate on your reasoning for this. i favor the high risk of a short position. i'm so glad you sent me this because if i've created any misperception that i favor shorting stocks, it is completely out of character with all my books and what i used to do at my hedge fund or before my hedge fund when i used to work for people at goldman sachs or when i was trading for myself. i always do puts, i rarely do shorts because as i write in "confessions of a street addict" i was the victim of a some bad short squeezes that lost me a ton of money. let's goat to some tweets. here's one from bkelly 019 @jim cramer, covered cal
, realistically can there be a grandiose bill that will attempt to solve our spending, deficit problem, with the overall framework? or talking about a band-aid? >> personally, i don't think we'll get the big plan in the next six days. it would be great if we could. >> the whole enchilada. but at least if we can get an appetizer -- no, seriously. if we can get assurance that realistic work is being done to provide tax relief, regulatory relief. the two big laws passed previously in 2010. affordable care act, well intentioned, very costly and those are posing problems too. >> earlier this week, we spoke with grover norquist. you signed the pledge not to sign taxes. >> i did. >> he supported speaker boehner's plan "b" and said it wouldn't violate his pledge. here's what he told us earlier this week. listen. >> i think in fact, plan "b" is a good step to protecting tax cuts for everybody. >> if you look at current law, current law says as we all know, part of the fiscal cliff '01, '03 tax relief measures will expire on january 1st. at this point, everybody's taxes go up. we all know that.
it to getting a deal, which included tax reform and deficit reduction. the talks fell aaparpaapart. >> how we get there god only knows. >> speaker boehner tried to pass an alternative bill that allowed tax rates to rise on those making a million dollars or more. >> they weren't taking that out on me. they were dealing with the perception that somebody might accuse them of raising taxes. >> reporter: before jetting off to hawaii, president obama was prepared to accept a smaller deal as long as it prevented taxes from going up on middle class americans and extended unemployment insurance. >> i expect democrats and republicans to get back to washington and have it pass both chambers, and i will immediately sign that legislation into law before january 1st of next year. >> reporter: but americans say the uncertainty in washington is casting a cloud over their holidays. >> they are responsible for the well-being of all americans, and right now they're more woern wored about politics. >> i would tell them to get off their butts, because most of us aren't making six-figure incomes and we need every
of the new tax regime that comes out of it and it will help the deficit. i am speaking anathema but that is certainty. shibani: 70 -- dennis: something wins and the economy could make stocks right at some point. thank you very much, jim laventhol. here's one retail segment that did great. gun, rifle and ammunition sales are skyrocketing following the backlash against guns at the connecticut elementary school. the world's largest supplier of firearms says it sold 3.5 years worth of ammunition clips for automatic weapons in just three days and a gun shop owner north carolina says gun sales for christmas or four times better than last year. many customers blame talk of stricter gun control for driving the rush. unintended consequences. let's look at gun stocks. the images that so smith and wesson, they are down. the middle of their sales are probably up. shibani: one of the most profitable industries out. 20% profit margins for gun sales. dennis: computer hardwaremakers 5%. shibani: on a business base is a lot of people trying to cash in because they're worried about stricter gun c
't that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says, you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since -- >> 1992. >> reporter: that's when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the death. the depression era kid and army veteran says he's giving back to a country that's given him so much. a sense that's infectious. his daughter is now collecting cabs at work. his grandson drives garcia to friends' houses, just to collect more cans. garcia knows that his monthly money orders won't avert the fiscal cliff, but his priest says that's not the message garcia's sending to congress. >> in order to really solve the $16 trillion national debt, you have to sacrifice. >> reporter: politicians talk about kicking the can down the road. one american has decided that road has to end, and it might as well be here. so if you want to be, like his granddaughter says, be like grandpa, you can google the
in terms of the deficit. nationally, you got all these people in the earlier segment playing blame game in washington. guess what? when you're spending more money than you pull in, eventually the money runs out. then you can blame all you want. but there is no money. for basic services, like police, like good education, all that stuff. they don't care about that. they spend the money on what they want to get elected. >> when you're saying that the previous mayor spent all the money, you're talking about mayor daly. rahm emanuel is in place now. >> right. >> he spent all the money on what? and then, two, what is the realistic proposal here to reverse the violence? >> well, over 20 years i can give you a laundry list of corruption and cronyism. but you know it well because you were here as well. and you saw it. there was a reporter once for "time" doing a cnn profile, comparing richard daly to andy of maybury and said he presides over chicago like andy of maybury. now that reporter is the press secretary for president obama. so there had been -- not you, obviously, but there had been peop
of fiscal sustainability just isn't right. we can't run trillion dollar deficits for a year and expect to get away with that long term. so i think there is a trade-off here in terms of some penalty to growth next year. longer term there are benefits though and going into the year i think you just have to have maybe a little cash in the portfolio but be looking to put money to work in companies that are going to survive, good balance sheets and consistent profitability. stocks are cheap relative to bonds so i don't want to get too defensive here. >> you were with us at the top of the hour and made clear you were on hold until you see something about a fiscal cliff resolution of some kind. is there nothing you would buy between now and the end of the year? >> nothing. maybe some inverse etfs, bill, quite honestly. i want to see not just fiscal cliff resolution but i want to see q 1 earnings. i'm sorry. q 4 earnings. last quarter's earnings were not all that exciting. we really saw the european effect take hold in a lot of these companies really laboring and a lot have bounced back. i thi
that getting the debt and deficit under control is in the interests of younger generations so they are not saddled with debt solely for our current consumption. but how we get there matters an awful lot. if you raise taxes on people at the top, that affects people mostly in their peak earning year, late 40s to their late 50s. if you focus the spending cuts on discretionary spending which is what we've done so far, you squeeze investment thes in the next generation. education, infrastructure, research. there really needs to be a balance both between taxes and spending and then on the spending side between restraining discretionary spending and restraining entitlements which are aimed at today's seniors. >> so many times we've heard talk about generational warfare between old and young. but this is a little bit different. >> right. first of all, there is no -- today there is generational warfare more in the opposite direction. the polls show that young people by and large are willing to pay for entitlements for today's seniors. what's eroded is the willingness of today's senior
need to do, we can run a 2% deficit. we need to get back to "x" amount of revenue, and "y" amount of government spending. and most people say somewhere between like 18 revenue, 20 spending, maybe 19 revenue, 21 pending. given what the democrats and the white house are offering on the spending cuts, do you feel that maybe they're thinking they want to keep it at 23, 22, 24? we're not seeing anything that gets us anywhere near 20 or 21 in terms of the offers we're seeing from them. are we? >> no. no. i mean, this would be like, you know, in 1969, we landed the first man on the moon. but it would have never happened if -- the only thing they worried about was exactly how the, you know, the lunar module was going to land, but not how they were going to leave the atmosphere of the earth. you can't worry about the little details on these tax issues. as much as the winners of the election want to punish the rich, because i can't think of any other reason that we dwell so much on that side of it, the rest of it, what did i read? senator corker was telling me before we went on air, and i w
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